Six Interesting Facts about INTJ Musicians

I recently posted about being an INTJ. This Myers-Briggs personality type is often maligned and frequently misunderstood. Writers usually make them villains, typically because of their inscrutability, seeming lack of emotion, and their emphasis on strategic thinking. “Knowledge is power,” as the old saying goes, so I thought I’d do my part and list a few interesting facts about INTJ musicians.

  1. INTJ’s don’t crave applause or being in the limelight. It’s not a matter of not wanting it, but rather of not needing it. This confuses many because they assume that someone either wants it or they don’t. INTJ’s instead want freedom to accomplish their goals. The limelight is useful only insomuch as it can enable this freedom. INTJ’s know full well the downside of the limelight-constantly being around people. It is very exhausting for INTJ’s to be around people for extended lengths of time.
  2. Because they don’t need to be in front of people, INTJ’s are perfectly fine with someone else leading, provided the other person knows what they are doing and are willing to consider feedback. Incompetent or vision-less leadership in an ensemble or organization is incredibly frustrating to INTJ’s, especially when the leadership won’t listen to the INTJ.
  3. INTJ conductors want their musicians to pull their own weight in the ensemble. No drama, just fix the mistake. With an INTJ who hasn’t been developing his people skills, dealing with an emotional colleague in this straightforward way can come across as bluntness. This is because INTJ’s have a hard time figuring out someone else’s emotions, much less how to best deal with them. Emotions aren’t logical. Someone who fixes their own issues with minimal emotional outbursts will instantly put an INTJ at ease.
  4. INTJ’s perform the same way when in front of an audience as they do when in their dressing room. They aren’t dependent on others’ energy, so their performances are very consistent.
  5. An INTJ musican’s relationship with emotion is a mistrustful one. INTJ’s know that emotions are necessary for good performances. However, they also know that overactive emotions can get in the way of prudent decision-making. INTJ’s channel the precise amount of feelings they need to in order to communicate effectively.
  6. INTJ’s love to be in positions where their plans can come to fruition. They always have a master plan or vision. In music, this appears in many different roles: directing ensembles, teaching classes and lessons, making a character come to life in an opera or musical, etc. It’s not really the vocations that are different, but the approach to the vocations. INTJ’s approach what they are doing very strategically. They ask themselves the following questions: What am I trying to accomplish (i.e. the goal)? What are the important pieces I need in order to complete the goal? How do the pieces fit in order to accomplish the goal? How do I get the pieces to work together in order to accomplish the goal?

Projects, and life in general, look like a giant chessboard to an INTJ. To some, this way of thinking and behaving might seem completely alien. Perhaps this is why you’ve had conflicts with that INTJ in your life. Hopefully this answers some questions you might have. Maybe it raised a few. In any case, now you know this type a little better.

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