What We Can Learn from Adele’s Singing 2

As promised, here is the second and last post in my series about Adele’s singing. For those of you who are interested, you can find the first post here. My first post dealt with Adele’s singing technique, and why she has struggled vocally.

However, there is a lot you can appreciate in her singing as well. Adele has accomplished much during the short years of her career. Her soulful singing stirs the heart, and–unlike much of pop music–her music actually has staying power.

This post highlights some of Adele’s strengths as a singer. These are qualities that all singers should develop. Singers will be much more successful in their performances if they do.

Lesson #1: Communication Is Insanely Important

Professional singers often focus extensively on technique. This is good in that their vocal chops are well developed and they have a much more durable and flexible voice. However, singers often forget about the purpose of singing: to communicate. Singing is an emotionally heightened form of speech.

More open and efficient communication should be the goal toward which all singers strive. Say what you will about her vocal technique, but Adele is a communicator par excellence. One might say that it is her superpower. When you watch live videos of her singing, you cannot take your eyes off her. If singers sought to communicate rather than merely focusing on technique, their singing would be so much more expressive and memorable. (This, by the way, is a major part of the so-called “X Factor” that many talk about).

So, how do you communicate effectively as a singer?

Lesson #2: Honest Facial Expression Is Key

It’s always surprising how emotionless singers look when they sing. Their face is completely deadpan. Not so with Adele. She never looks quite happy, to be sure, but that goes with singing sad songs. She has enough facial expression that you truly believe she is in the moment.

Not only do faces need to be animated, but they also need to be honest. The opposite extreme of the deadpan face is the hyper-animated face. Everything is exaggerated. This tends to make singers look like caricatures of real people. As a case in point: I recently watched on TV a performance of a major choral work with soloists. I was astounded at how distracting the facial expressions of the soloists were. They contorted their faces into some of the strangest shapes. Any emotion you portray on your face must be believable.

Lesson #3: Economy of Gesture Is Powerful

If you ever watch a video of Adele performing, you will be struck by how little she moves. She simply stands there most of the time. Other singers prance around the stage and gesticulate wildly to keep your attention. So how does she hold your interest?

Adele knows how to pace her gestures. She’ll start with very little movement, and increase the amount gradually as the song builds to its climax. It’s brilliant and highly effective. In the context of gesture, less often equals more. This pacing of gesture also lends her an air of gravitas which most singers would love to have.

Lesson #4: Start Small and Build

As a major part of drama, this rule cannot be stressed enough. Adele clearly understands this. Singers frequently begin their songs too loud and too expressive. As a consequence, they have nowhere to grow. Their songs contain no sense of movement towards a climax. Try singing quieter at the beginning of a song. Not only will this save your voice, but it will give your music a sense of forward motion. You will sustain interest, and the climax of the piece will be so much more satisfying.

To Sum Up

Singers all have strengths and weaknesses. Wise students try to learn as much as they can from these other singers. Simply put, learn from their mistakes and successes. This will stop you from repeating the former and enable you to emulate the latter.

[Source: CHRISTOPHER MACSURAK at http://flickr.com/photos/60877182@N00/3211379321. License:  cc-by-2.0.]
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